Crafting Your Experience

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ArtTourYEG

The Quarters of Edmonton

Few places are better than Jasper Avenue and 97 Street to explore the layers of history at the heart of Edmonton. Stroll through the hub of boomtown settlement and uncover a rich mix of histories, cultures, and development eras-from Indigenous pre-settlement landscape to modern day cityscape. Enjoy the tour! -Susan Pointe, Curator of ArtTourYEG

  • 1.

    Maggie Ray Morris, All Out (2004-05)

    Maggie Ray Morris, All Out (2004-05)

  • 2.

    Brandon Vickerd, Wild Life (2015)

    Brandon Vickerd, Wild Life (2015)

  • 3.

    Rebecca Belmore & Osvaldo Yero, Wild Rose (2015)

    Rebecca Belmore & Osvaldo Yero, Wild Rose (2015)

  • 4.

    Kinistinâw Park (2016)

    Kinistinâw Park (2016)

  • 5.

    The Artists’ Quarters | Ukrainian Bookstore | Koermann Block (1911)

    The Artists’ Quarters | Ukrainian Bookstore | Koermann Block (1911)

  • 6.

    Derek Besant, Walkways (2016)

    Derek Besant, Walkways (2016)

  • 7.

    iHuman Youth, Untitled Paintings (2011-12)

    iHuman Youth, Untitled Paintings (2011-12)

  • 8.

    Okîsikow (Angel) Way (2011)

    Okîsikow (Angel) Way (2011)

  • 9.

    Hyatt Place | The Armature (2016)

    Hyatt Place | The Armature (2016)

  • 10.

    Gibson Block (1913) | Ghost Signage (c. 1920-30s)

    Gibson Block (1913) | Ghost Signage (c. 1920-30s)

  • 11.

    Edmonton Chinatown Multicultural Centre (1985) | Chinatown Chinese Library (2009) | Dr. Sun Yat-Sen: Father of Modern China

    Edmonton Chinatown Multicultural Centre (1985) | Chinatown Chinese Library (2009) | Dr. Sun Yat-Sen: Father of Modern China

  • 12.

    Ian Mulder & iHuman Youth, State of the Art Graffiti Competition (2007)

    Ian Mulder & iHuman Youth, State of the Art Graffiti Competition (2007)

  • 13.

    North Saskatchewan River | Boyle Street

    North Saskatchewan River | Boyle Street

    Jasper Avenue & 97 Street (Namayo Avenue), the heart of original Edmonton, has built heritage dating back to the 1880s. But Edmonton’s history goes far beyond surviving buildings.

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