Crafting Your Experience

New YorkHistory
NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project

Stonewall National Monument & Village Pride Tour

Greenwich Village has a long and diverse history that has made it an important epicenter of LGBT life in New York City. In the pre-Stonewall years, amidst an atmosphere of fear and repression, gay bars and other social gathering spaces were crucial in creating a sense of community and brewing political agitation. This curated adventure, written and produced by the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project, features the Stonewall National Monument and highlights a few significant LGBT historic sites near Stonewall. This tour represents a selection of sites associated with LGBT history that are located within a very small geographic area surrounding the Stonewall Inn. As such, it does not represent the entire long LGBT history of Greenwich Village, nor does it entirely reflect the diversity of today’s LGBT community. For more information, please visit our website at www.nyclgbtsites.org.

  • 1.

    Greenwich Village and its LGBT History

    Greenwich Village and its LGBT History

    A Brief Overview about the Tour to Contextualize Stonewall

  • 2.

    About the NYC LGBT Historical Sites Project

    About the NYC LGBT Historical Sites Project

    Learn about the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project

  • 3.

    Elmer Ephraim Ellsworth Flagpole

    Elmer Ephraim Ellsworth Flagpole

    Remembering the first officer killed in the Civil War.

  • 4.

    Murray H. Hall Residence

    Murray H. Hall Residence

    This rowhouse near the Jefferson Market police court (now the Jefferson Market Library) was the last residence and office of Tammany politico Murray H. Hall at the turn of the 20th century.After passing away, Hall was revealed to have been a woman after living for over 30 years as a man.

  • 5.

    Stewart's Cafeteria

    Stewart's Cafeteria

    Stewart’s Cafeteria, later the Life Cafeteria, was located in this Greenwich Village building in the 1930s and attracted a bohemian and gay and lesbian following.The large plate glass windows put gay life on full display to the late-night crowds who frequented this busy intersection.

  • 6.

    Greenwich Village Waterfront

    Greenwich Village Waterfront

    For over a century, the Greenwich Village waterfront along the Hudson River, including the Christopher Street Pier at West 10th and West Streets, has been a destination for the LGBT community that has evolved from a place for cruising and sex for gay men to an important safe haven for a marginalized queer community – mostly queer homeless youth of color.

  • 7.

    The Snake Pit

    The Snake Pit

    In 1970, less than a year after Stonewall, the police raided the Snake Pit bar and detained many people at the local police station.After one person attempted to escape and was impaled on a fence, the Gay Activists Alliance and Gay Liberation Front quickly assembled a protest march, the results of which demonstrated the strength of the recently formed gay rights organizations and inspired more people to become politically active.

  • 8.

    Gay Liberation Front at Alternate U.

    Gay Liberation Front at Alternate U.

    After the Stonewall rebellion in June 1969, the first LGBT activist organization formed was the Gay Liberation Front (GLF), in July.GLF used Alternate U., a free counterculture school and leftist political organizing center in Greenwich Village, for many of its activities through 1970.

  • 9.

    Oscar Wilde Bookshop

    Oscar Wilde Bookshop

    The first gay and lesbian bookshop in America takes inspiration from Oscar Wilde for its name.

  • 10.

    Julius’

    Julius’

    On April 21, 1966, a “Sip-In” was organized by members of the Mattachine Society, one of the country’s earliest gay rights organizations, to challenge the State Liquor Authority’s discriminatory policy of revoking the licenses of bars that served known or suspected gay men and lesbians.

  • 11.

    Stonewall Inn & Christopher Park

    Stonewall Inn & Christopher Park

    Before the 1960s almost everything about living openly as a lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) person was illegal. New York City laws against homosexual activities were particularly harsh. The Stonewall Uprising on June 28, 1969 is a milestone in the quest for LGBT civil rights and provided momentum for a movement.

  • 12.

    Ridiculous Theatrical Co.

    Ridiculous Theatrical Co.

    Celebrating the ridiculous, the weird, and everything in between.

  • 13.

    Marie's Crisis

    Marie's Crisis

    From speakeasy to piano bar.

  • 14.

    Mattachine Society

    Mattachine Society

    Home of homophile pioneers.

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