Crafting Your Experience

New YorkHistory
NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project

LGBT Jackson Heights, Queens and Further Afield

This experience is sponsored, in part, by the generous support of American Express, Con Edison, and a Humanities New York Action Grant. Jackson Heights has been home to LGBT residents since the 1920s, when a population boom included a significant number of Broadway theater artists who were attracted to the convenient subway commute from Times Square to the quiet, newly-built residential enclave. After the opening of LaGuardia Airport, gay travelers and flight attendants waited out layovers by visiting a small entertainment district on 37th Avenue. Beginning in the 1970s, Latino immigrants arrived in Jackson Heights in large numbers and, gradually, gay bars in the area catered predominantly to LGBT Latinos. Until the activism spurred on by the gay-biased murder of Julio Rivera in July 1990, however, the LGBT community of the neighborhood — and Queens in general — was largely invisible. This curated collection includes sites associated with the Queens Pride Parade, Latino nightlife, and important LGBT meeting spaces. This tour represents a selection of extant sites associated with LGBT history that are located within a small geographic area. As such, it does not represent the entire long LGBT history of New York City, nor does it entirely reflect the diversity of today’s LGBT community. This collection is limited to the research we have included on the project website so far. For more information or to suggest a site, please visit our website at www.nyclgbtsites.org.

  • 1.

    About the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project

    About the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project

    Learn about the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project

  • 2.

    Manford Family Residence

    Manford Family Residence

    The nation’s first group for parents of lesbian and gay children, now known as PFLAG, was founded here.

  • 3.

    New York State Pavilion

    New York State Pavilion

    Designed by Philip Johnson, site of controversy about Andy Warhol’s work for the 1964 World’s Fair.

  • 4.

    Julio Rivera Corner

    Julio Rivera Corner

    Commemorates a gay man who in 1990 was attacked and died, which mobilized LGBT activism in Queens.

  • 5.

    Bum Bum Bar

    Bum Bum Bar

    From the early 1990s until 2018, this bar catered to a predominately Latina lesbian clientele.

  • 6.

    Kitty Genovese Residence

    Kitty Genovese Residence

    The 1964 sensationalized murder of Genovese, who lived here with her girlfriend, captivated the public.

  • 7.

    West Side Tennis Club

    West Side Tennis Club

    Several notable LGBT players competed here until the U.S. Open moved to its current location in 1978.

  • 8.

    Starting Point of First Queens Pride Parade

    Starting Point of First Queens Pride Parade

    The inaugural Queens Pride Parade and Multicultural Festival began here in 1993.

  • 9.

    The Love Boat

    The Love Boat

    Popular gay Latino bar and dance space, drawing crowds from countries throughout Latin America.

  • 10.

    Friend's Tavern

    Friend's Tavern

    Known as the oldest active gay bar in Queens, particularly important for gay and bisexual Latino men.

  • 11.

    Start of First St. Pat’s for All Parade

    Start of First St. Pat’s for All Parade

    Since 2000, the St. Pat’s for All Parade has taken place in this area of Queens.

  • 12.

    Franklin E. Kameny Childhood Residence

    Franklin E. Kameny Childhood Residence

    The renowned gay rights pioneer grew up in this semi-detached brick house from 1925 to 1948.

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