Crafting Your Experience

ChicagoHistory
Chicago History Museum

AMPLIFIED: Chicago Blues

Explore some of the locations of the Chicago blues scene of the 1960s with this VAMONDE adventure, based on the Chicago History Museum exhibition, "AMPLIFIED: Chicago Blues." Southern black migrants brought the blues to Chicago, where the music helped them forge connections and transform an unfamiliar, often inhospitable city into a new home. The music was also transformed—electrified and amplified to compete with urban noise. The photography of Raeburn Flerlage captures the streets, clubs, homes, and studios where a community of musicians defined the Chicago blues sound.

  • 1.

    Pepper's Lounge

    Pepper's Lounge

    Pepper’s Lounge was founded by Johnny Pepper in 1956 and was the place to hear blues on south side.

  • 2.

    Little Brother Montgomery's Home

    Little Brother Montgomery's Home

    Chicago blues legend Little Brother Montgomery lived at this house for several years.

  • 3.

    Silvio's

    Silvio's

    Silvio’s was one of Chicago’s premier blues clubs and often attracted a diverse audience.

  • 4.

    Delmark Records

    Delmark Records

    Delmark was one of Chicago's prominent independent blues and jazz recording labels.

  • 5.

    1815 Club

    1815 Club

    1815 Club was the spot for blues on Chicago’s West Side.

  • 6.

    Muddy Waters' Home

    Muddy Waters' Home

    Muddy Waters is perhaps the best known and most influential Chicago blues musician.

  • 7.

    Willie Dixon Sound Studios

    Willie Dixon Sound Studios

    Willie Dixon is the man behind an extraordinary number of Chicago blues songs recorded on Chess Records.

  • 8.

    Maxwell Street Market

    Maxwell Street Market

    For over a century, Sundays in the city of Chicago have included a trip to the Maxwell Street Market.

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