Crafting Your Experience

Washington DCHistory
Alexandria Archaeology Museum

Alexandria's Civil War Hospitals

Alexandria was occupied by Union troops throughout the Civil War serving primarily as a logistics and hospital center. The Union Army established over 30 hospitals which treated both Union and Confederate soldiers as well as freed slaves, who were referred to as contrabands. Many of the hospitals were set up in existing large public buildings and homes. Many are still standing. You can take a leisurely stroll through Old Town’s interesting streets to see them as they are today and to learn a little of their history. For more information about and images of these and other nearby hospitals look for the Dig Deeper button on each of the individual posts. Web pages about each of the hospitals in this adventure include first-hand accounts from the nurses, doctors, patients, and visitors to Union hospitals as well as more about the history of the buildings before and after the Civil War.

  • 1.

    Lyceum Hall Hospital

    Lyceum Hall Hospital

    This 1839 library / meeting hall, the city’s intellectual center became the Union Army’s 80-bed hospital

  • 2.

    Introduction

    Introduction

    Alexandria's Archaeology Museum has studied the buildings and locations of 30+ Civil War Union Hospitals.

  • 3.

    Grosvenor House & Grosvenor Branch Hospitals

    Grosvenor House & Grosvenor Branch Hospitals

    Only the Branch (now called Lee-Fendall House) remains. Together they served hundreds of patients.

  • 4.

    King Street Hospital

    King Street Hospital

    200-204 King St. were businesses with a home on upper floors but became a 100-bed hospital.

  • 5.

    Mansion House Hotel Hospital

    Mansion House Hotel Hospital

    A premier hotel became a 500-bed military hospital - the largest hospital in a confiscated building

  • 6.

    St. Paul's Episcopal Church

    St. Paul's Episcopal Church

    An architecturally significant church became a hospital in part due to parishioners’ Southern sympathies.

  • 7.

    Wolfe Street Hospitals

    Wolfe Street Hospitals

    Three structures made up the complex: Tuscan Villa, 510 Wolfe, & Friends Meeting House; only 510 remains

  • 8.

    Washington Hall Hospital

    Washington Hall Hospital

    This 1855 theater had 600+ seats but became one of the many small Union hospitals clustered nearby.

  • 9.

    Prince Street Hospitals

    Prince Street Hospitals

    Two large, imposing residences originally belonging to Southern sympathizers became Union hospitals.

We use cookies on this website. You are free to manage these via your browser settings at any time. For more information about how we use cookies, please see our Privacy Policy.